“Are you stupid or something?”

There was one little girl who would cry herself to sleep every night as thoughts of dread filled her mind about going to school in the morning.  School was so very hard for her with its noisy classrooms full of the talking moving kids. The boy next to her would tap his foot, the girl in front would twirl her hair, and the boy behind would tap his pencil and sniffle.

During quiet work time the teacher would erase the blackboard and open and close her desk drawers while chatting students would walk down the hallway drawing her interest through the open classroom door. When the radiator would turn on it made a particular noise and even the tick of the clock on the wall would beg her minds notice.

All these distractions would disrupt her focus and grab her attention away from the school work that was before her.

She would really try her very best to concentrate but she just struggled to stay focused on a single task. Her little mind was always going and so when the teacher would call on her to answer a question or contribute to the classroom discussion she would get all flushed, nervous and confused in what to say. The teacher would blurt out “Try harder! You’re not trying hard enough!!!”.

She would hear her classmates snicker and say things like “That is so easy. Are you stupid or something?”

It wasn’t all that unusual for the whole class to break out in laughter as she stumbled for words to satisfy the teacher so she could then sit back down and have the spotlight pulled off of her.

Inside her young heart felt like it was going to burst out of her chest and she just wanted to run home to her bedroom, hide her face in her pillow and cry. Those moments, which felt like eons, seemed to always end with the teacher scolding her to just sit down and start paying attention.  To her sorrow and disappointment there was no running away from the problem that resided inside her head and plagued her.

In today’s classroom, this little girl would have probably been labeled with Attention Deficit Disorder, but not back then. To her sorrow and the disappointment of her parents there was no running away from the problem that resided inside her head and plagued her.

How did this little girl get like this? What happened to her? Some say it was because she was emotionally traumatized very early on in her life, being spared abortion, by God’s grace, through the Salvation Army that convinced her young teenage mother to complete the pregnancy and to give her baby up for adoption. Others say, No! a baby has no ability to be affected by emotional turbulence and hurtful words while growing inside of her mother’s womb so it must be the traumatic experience of the several foster homes she was moved in and out of early on in her infancy and childhood. One said perhaps she sustained an injury to her head while others suspect she could have been exposed to something environmental.

To this little girl, it really didn’t matter why because at this point she already had the programming in her head of being unlovable and unworthy. Even after her parents adopted her, the message that she kept subconsciously playing in her little mind over and over was, “You’re not good enough to keep, not good enough to fit in and not good enough to be friends with.”

Whether trauma is due to emotional, physical or environmental factors, the human brain can develop neurological dysfunctions which affect a person’s ability to manage stress, process information, or effectively navigate through life situations in a healthy way. In fact, in my experience as a Brain Integration Practitioner, this trauma usually starts in childhood.

Something happens that the child registers as traumatic, as in the case with our little girl, and the child does not have the computing capacity in their brain to make sense of it. They just know it hurts, so the brain goes into ‘protect mode’ and shuts down that hurt area of the brain in order to stop the hurting. The brain signal gets cut off and the blood flow gets reduced to that region. Problem is, the brain is very young and still developing and these areas seldom get turned back on because work-around routes have started developing around the now closed areas. These work-around routes soon become the main routes for brain function but they are never as efficient as the organic primary routes. Unfortunately, those protected/blocked off areas will remain closed and undeveloped through adulthood unless they are reopened and restored.

Brain Integration can restore those blocked areas of the brain!

Research shows that up to half of those with learning disabilities go undiagnosed. When undiagnosed, the embarrassment, self-doubt, pressure and social stigma a child experiences can lead to more than academic difficulties. Learning disabled students may also develop self-esteem, emotional, and social problems. Many will give up the struggle — in fact, the dropout rate for children with learning disorders is nearly 40 percent.

How much longer can you bear watching your child struggle, feeling helpless to relieve their internal suffering all the while enduring the affects it is having on the entire family? What about you? What messages have been playing inside of your head over and over that has kept you prisoner from your full potential and a life of joy? Like with our little girl, she didn’t know consciously what the root of her hurt was, she just knew how painful every day was to get through. Her parents anguished over her struggles but felt helpless to fix it while well-wishers told them, “She is just a little girl and she will grow out of it and be normal like other kids someday.” Really? Really? I’ll save that for next time.

Until then…… Schedule your appointment today for a Bio-Energetic Assessment to learn how Brain Integration can help you, your child or your loved one. I can help. It’s drug-free. There is hope! Really!!